Yellow from Sunrise to Sunset

Source: Remodelista, Architecture: Rafe Churchill, Design: Heide Hendricks, Photography: John Gruen
Source: Remodelista, Architecture: Rafe Churchill, Design: Heide Hendricks, Photography: John Gruen

Painting a kitchen yellow is one of the simplest ways to bring cheer and warmth into the room where you prepare food and your friends gather.

In designer Hendricks’s design, she keeps the walls traditionally white, and instead paints the cabinets and trim a brilliant yellow (Babouche from Farrow & Ball), making the yellow a feature of the kitchen, rather than the background.

Source: Remodelista, Architecture: Rafe Churchill, Design: Heidi Hendricks, Photography: John Gruen
Source: Remodelista, Architecture: Rafe Churchill, Design: Heidi Hendricks, Photography: John Gruen

The color can be intense, and unless you really love yellow, you may want to keep it on the walls or on accent pieces. However, the beauty of this color in this specific home is that Hendricks pulled it in from the meadow outside, so it connects the interior and exterior environments. The yellow even deepens over the course of the day, as if the sun were setting inside this west side kitchen.

Source: Houzz, Architecture: Andersson-Wise Architects, Project: Stone Creek Camp
The less intense hue here is relaxing, and is reminiscent of grasses rather than flowers in a meadow. It’s still a strong component of the design, but nothing is going to take away from that view. Seriously.
Source: The Design Files, Furniture Design: Mark Tuckey, Photography: Lucas Allen
Source: The Design Files, Furniture Design: Mark Tuckey, Photography: Lucas Allen

For those who prefer a pop of color, check out the reserved use of yellow in this bedroom: accented by the pillow, echoed by the patterns on the quilt, and is gently reflected in the blond wood of the bed frame. The background colors, from floor to ceiling, emphasize the bed without making it an overwhelming feature in the design. That egg cup stool by Mark Tuckey is lovely, too!

If you need help with making your favorite color an integral and happy part of your space, contact me and let’s talk!

 

Featured image source: Remodelista, Architecture: Rafe Churchill, Design: Heidi Hendricks, Photography: John Gruen

4 Comments

    1. According to the architect, Rafe Churchill (www.rafechurchill.com), the holes provide fresh air drawn in from the basement (and over a heating coil to prevent cold air from filling the kitchen) to help the exhaust fan work properly. The home is sealed so tightly that when the fan is on, it requires extra air to make up for what it’s sucking out of the kitchen.

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