No Closet, No Problem

No Closet, No Problem
Source: Dwell, Architect M. Scott Ball
Source: Dwell, Architect M. Scott Ball

This beautiful bedroom is part of a house designed to look like a repurposed urban loft. The design adapts elements seen in an industrial building such as open floor plans (the bedroom is not enclosed) and lots of tall windows to make efficient use of natural light.

Besides the beautiful architecture, focus for a moment on the clothing rack, which makes not having a closet a non-issue for the homeowner. Rather than feeling forced to buy an armoire, closet system, or dresser–all of which would take up physical and visual space in a most boxy way–the choice to have open storage of clothing is bold and innovative (precisely because it breaks the rule of hiding clothes in something boxy).

Open storage of clothing works in the same way that books work on a bookshelf: they have color, texture, shape, and look good. When you organize your clothes according to one of those features, you create a pattern that becomes a part of the overall room’s design.

The trick, as with books or any collection of items on display (dishes, action figures, typewriters, etc), is to maintain the organization–which is more challenging because clothes move: they enter when we shop, they go on hiatus in the hamper, and they leave when we give them away.

Source: Stella Bleu Designs
Source: Stella Bleu Designs

Due to this changeability, if staying organized is a challenge or a chore, either use open storage as an incentive to strengthen your skills for staying on top of things or accept that containers may be better matched to your casual style of housekeeping.

Would you like help in organizing your closet? Send me a note and let’s work on it together!



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